Last edited by Mogami
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pea Family of British Columbia. found in the catalog.

Pea Family of British Columbia.

British Columbia Provincial Museum.

Pea Family of British Columbia.

by British Columbia Provincial Museum.

  • 286 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesBritish Columbia Provincial Museum Handbook -- 32
ContributionsTaylor, T.M.C.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21825684M

The fifth fabaceous species in this series on the pea family, Clianthus puniceus is a critically-endangered species now only extant on a small island (~5ha or ~12 acres) within a harbour of New Zealand’s North Island. Threats include summer droughts, competition from weeds, and browsing animals, including rodents. It is also located in the southeast tip of British Columbia and the southwest tip of Manitoba. Habitat. Golden bean plants can be found in open sandy areas in prairie and aspen forest where the water table is high. How to Observe. If the plants are very abundant, mark a plot about one metre by one metre in size. Record these dates.

Garden Pea Okanagan-Colville - Food, Unspecified Use documented by: Turner, Nancy J., R. Bouchard and Dorothy I.D. Kennedy, , Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington, Victoria. British Columbia Provincial Museum, page View all documented uses for Pisum sativum L. Thermopsis montana – mountain buck-bean, mountain golden-banner, mountain golden-pea, mountain thermopsis Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rockies of Montana and Colorado. Habitat: Sandy, well-drained soil to wet meadowland, low to moderate elevations.

Description. This section is from the book "Principal Poisonous Plants Of Canada", by Faith available from Amazon: Principal poisonous plants of Canada. This section is from the "" book, Weed. (Oxytropis Lamberti Pursh.) Pea. Family. The classic A1 locus in sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus) was investigated by Bateson, Punnett, and Saunders in the early 20th century history of Mendelian mutation, in the form of the pink and white cultivar ‘Painted Lady’, is known from the 18th century. We show that this locus is associated with a single base pair mutation ( G/A) in the flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylase (F3 Cited by: 1.


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Pea Family of British Columbia by British Columbia Provincial Museum. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The pea family (Leguminosae) of British Columbia [T. Taylor, Drawings & Maps] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Pea family (Leguminosae) of British Columbia.

Victoria: British Columbia Provincial Museum, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Mayne Cunninghame Taylor.

Leguminosae (Fabaceae) - pea family Gerald A. Mulligan Research Scientist and Research Institute Director (retired) and presently Honorary Research Associate, Agriculture and. Idaho Mountain Wildflowers. Home Purchase book.

The Pea Family: Fabaceae. The older scientific name for the pea family, Leguminosae, is one of several family names that don’t end in “-aceae”, so many botanists prefer Fabaceae (from the Latin word “faba,” for “bean”). Montana and British Columbia. The plants spread by. Fabaceae Plants of the Pea Family (Previously known as the Legume Family: Leguminosae) If you have seen a pea or bean blossom in the garden, then you will be able to recognize members of the Pea family.

These are irregular flowers, with 5 petals forming a distinctive "banner, wings, and keel", as shown in the illustration. Lupines are one of the more common wildflowers in British Columbia.

This member of the pea family is a perennial which can reach a height of over 70 cm. The Pea family is very well represented throughout the UK and Europe - they are particularly plentiful in the Mediterranean region.

The flowers have five petals, two of which are joined at the keel; another common characteristic is the elongated seed pods of flowers of this family. Bibliography is the science of describing published works, and the bibliography of British Columbia is located in traditional printed bibliographies.

The goal of the BC Historical Books project is to build a single searchable database of the bibliography of British Columbia based on full-text searchable versions of the books contained therein. PEA Collective Agreement. The most recent terms agreed to by the province and the Professional Employees Association: PEA 16th Main and Subsidiary Agreements (January ) (PDF, MB) Memorandum of Settlement for the 16th Main and Subsidiary Agreements (PDF,KB) Historic Agreements.

PEA 15th Master and Subsidiary Agreements (PDF, 1KB). Lupinus rivularis Dougl. Lindl. (streambank lupine) is a particularly beautiful species of lupine that stands between 4 and 6 dm. It has an erect habit and lovely lavender flowers that bloom from May until September. While taxonomy and nomenclature for North American lupines is particularly confusing, this species is readily identifiable, particularly when adding features of habitat and.

The Pea family name was found in the USA, the UK, Canada, and Scotland between and The most Pea families were found in the USA in In there were 2 Pea families living in British Columbia. This was about 50% of all the recorded Pea's in Canada. British Columbia had the highest population of Pea families in Beach pea is a perennial, rhizomatous herbaceous species that is circumboreal in distribution.

It is "widely distributed on coasts of temperate Asia, Europe, North America, and South America (Chile)" (Flora of China ).In North America, this includes the coastal areas of the Great Lakes. Discover the best British Columbia Travel Guides in Best Sellers. Find the top most popular items in Amazon Books Best Sellers.

Source: The Illustrated Flora of British Columbia Illustration If more than one illustration is available for a species (e.g., separate illustrations were provided for two subspecies) then links to the separate images will be provided below.

References REFERENCES GENERAL Abrams, L.R. — Illustrated flora of the Pacific States: Washington, Oregon and California. Vols. 1—3. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books.

My library. Douglas, G.W., A. Ceska and G.G. Ruyle. A floristic bibliography for British Columbia. B.C. Ministry of Forests Land Management Repon No. Salary information for all employee groups including those in the BCGEU, Management, Nurses and PEA.

B.C. has declared a state of emergency. Learn about COVID health issues. Free Books / Flora and Plants / Principal Poisonous Plants Of Canada / Pulse Or Pea Family (Leguminosae) - Lupines (Lupinus Sp.) - Plate XXII.

Description. This section is from the book the lupines in Canada are found on the prairies of Saskatchewan and Alberta and on the hillsides and mountains of British Columbia. Lupines (Lupinus spp.), are also members of the pea family (Fabaceae) with distinctive pea pod looking fruits.

Lupines contain many toxic alkaloids, especially in the seeds and pods. A few species also contain enzyme inhibitors (Turner and Szczawinski ). Trifolium willdenovii, the tomcat clover, is a species of plant in the pea family Fabaceae.

This species occurs in the western part of North America. As an example occurrence, it is found in the California Coast Ranges in such places as Ring Mountain, California, where it Clade: Tracheophytes.Thermopsis montana – mountain buck-bean, mountain golden-banner, mountain golden-pea, mountain thermopsis Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but only occurring in the far western and eastern counties; British Columbia to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.Alkaloid concentra- tions in lupine samples were also determined by GC [6, 17] and their identities confirmed by GC-MS.

REFERENCES 1. Dunn, D. B. and Gillett, J. M. () The Lupines of Canada and Alaska. Research Branch, Agriculture Canada, Monograph No. 2, Ottawa, Canada. 2. Taylor, T. M. C. () The Pea Family (Legumin- osae) of British Cited by: